The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Category Best New Music

REVIEW: Jorja Smith – ‘Lost & Found’ (FAMM)

Jorja Smith’s diverse range of styles and genre exercises, as well as her stunning vocal ability, make ‘Lost & Found’ one of the best British pop debuts in years.

REVIEW: Kids See Ghosts – ‘KIDS SEE GHOSTS’ (GOOD / Def Jam)

On ‘Kids See Ghosts’, Kanye West and Kid Cudi find in each other the perfect creative foil – Cudi setting the mood and bringing lyrical honesty, while West provides the edge with his verses and ingenious sampling.

REVIEW: Snail Mail – ‘Lush’ (Matador)

Lindsey Jordan’s first full Snail Mail album ‘Lush’ is an intensely detailed document of life and love while adjusting to adulthood, and fulfills all the breathless predictions made for it.

REVIEW: Neko Case – ‘Hell-On’ (Anti-)

Eclectic yet completely coherent, Neko Case’s eighth solo album ‘Hell-On’ is a triumph for female storytelling in modern music.

REVIEW: LUMP – ‘LUMP’ (Dead Oceans)

‘LUMP’, a collaboration between Laura Marling and Tunng’s Mike Lindsay, feels like you’re right in the studio amid the exchange of ideas.

REVIEW: Father John Misty – ‘God’s Favorite Customer’ (Bella Union)

Josh Tillman’s fourth Father John Misty album ‘God’s Favorite Customer’ marks a new chapter in his career, channelling his wit and self-deprecation into his most emotionally brutal record yet.

REVIEW: Stephen Malkmus And The Jicks – ‘Sparkle Hard’ (Domino)

Now in his fifties, Stephen Malkmus’s appetite for casually experimenting with his mellifluous indie-rock sound is only getting more voracious, as ‘Sparkle Hard’ demonstrates.

REVIEW: Courtney Barnett – ‘Tell Me How You Really Feel’ (Milk! / Mom + Pop / Marathon)

‘Tell Me How You Really Feel’ sees Courtney Barnett aim for a richer, darker and more harrowing sound for her sophomore effort, and it feels like a natural and successful musical evolution.

REVIEW: Beach House – ‘7’ (Bella Union)

On ‘7’, Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally make their most dramatic alterations yet to the tried-and-tested Beach House formula, and it’s a creative risk that pays off handsomely.