The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Posts by Aiste Samuchovaite

REVIEW: U.S. Girls – ‘Heavy Light’ (4AD)

Letting our collective anxiety about the state of the world stew in glacial, literate pop, Meghan Remy’s latest U.S. Girls album ‘Heavy Light’ is different to her previous masterpiece.

REVIEW: Andy Shauf – ‘The Neon Skyline’ (Anti-)

A song cycle of friendship, desire and regret, ‘The Neon Skyline’ shows that Andy Shauf continues to blossom as a songwriter.

REVIEW: Richard Dawson – ‘2020’ (Domino)

On sixth album ‘2020’, Richard Dawson narrates our modern, hyper-branded, anxious and rushed world.

REVIEW: Angel Olsen – ‘All Mirrors’ (Jagjaguwar)

On her fourth album ‘All Mirrors’, Angel Olsen effortlessly evolves into a synth-rock queen, embracing emotional turbulence and upheaval.

REVIEW: Brittany Howard – ‘Jaime’ (Sony)

Her first solo album outside of Alabama Shakes, Brittany Howard roots ‘Jaime’ in her previous sound but leans to a more tender and experimental style.

REVIEW: Metronomy – ‘Metronomy Forever’ (Because)

A curious, diverse yet vaguely conceptual album designed to be picked apart for personal playlists, ‘Metronomy Forever’ sees Joseph Mount enter yet another new phase.

REVIEW: Bat For Lashes – ‘Lost Girls’ (AWAL)

A concept album about girl vampire bikers in Eighties’ L.A., Natasha Khan’s fifth Bat For Lashes album ‘Lost Girls’ is her most all-encapsulating work yet.

REVIEW: Black Belt Eagle Scout – ‘At The Party With My Brown Friends’ (Saddle Creek)

Katherine Paul’s second Black Belt Eagle Scout album in barely over a year, ‘At The Party With My Brown Friends’ lacks some of the gut-punching immediacy of its predecessor.

CLASSIC ’90s: Jeff Buckley – ‘Grace’

‘Grace’, the sole completed album by the iconic Jeff Buckley before his untimely death at the age of 30, still stands up as a universally relatable yet highly personal record.

REVIEW: Bon Iver – ‘i, i’ (Jagjaguwar)

Justin Vernon’s fourth Bon Iver album ‘i, i’ emphasises the balance that needs to be struck between community and the individual, and is his warmest music yet.

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