The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Tag Island

REVIEW: Mumford & Sons – ‘Delta’ (Island Records)

On their fourth LP Delta, Mumford & Sons are yet again inoffensive and as approachable as they always were. A cohesive effort, but one that lacks any real substance.

REVIEW: Robyn – ‘Honey’ (Island / Universal / Konichiwa)

Robyn is back, at long last, breathing fresh air into pop music with her first album in eight years, and ‘Honey’ only shows how much her presence was needed.

REVIEW: Spring King – ‘A Better Life’ (Island)

Major label indie-rock hopefuls Spring King deliver a disappointing follow-up to a strong debut with ‘A Better Life’.

REVIEW: Ben Howard – ‘Noonday Dream’ (Island / Universal)

Ben Howard’s third record ‘Noonday Dream’ sees him explore lengthier and ever more sombre songwriting, but it retains the charming and compelling qualities that made him a star many years ago.

REVIEW: U2 – ‘Songs Of Experience’ (Island / Universal)

‘Songs Of Experience’ is a conscious, concerted effort from four men nearing their 60s to seize the zeitgeist and sound relevant in 2017.

REVIEW: The Killers – ‘Wonderful Wonderful’ (Island / UMG)

The first album from The Killers in five years, ‘Wonderful Wonderful’, sees the band struggling to break with their old ways, but only sometimes sucessfully.

REVIEW: Mr Jukes – ‘God First’ (Island)

‘God First’, Jack Steadman’s first solo statement outside of Bombay Bicycle Club, is occasionally intriguing but too messy to be consistent.

REVIEW: Tove Lo – ‘Lady Wood’ (Island)

With ‘Lady Wood’, Lo hasn’t managed to explore that aspect of her persona enough and grow from what she introduced us to on ‘Queen Of The Clouds’.

REVIEW: Mumford & Sons – ‘Johannesburg’ EP (Island)

by John Tindale After rocketing to fame in the last half decade and picking up awards on both sides of the Atlantic, Mumford & Sons are without doubt one of the biggest bands on the planet. But no success is without criticism and, despite the Grammy and BRIT plaudits, many people still label them as stale and formulaic.

REVIEW: PJ Harvey – ‘The Hope Six Demolition Project’ (Island / Vagrant)

by Ed Biggs The astonishing and quite unexpected success of Let England Shake, arguably the finest album of the decade so far, not only brought PJ Harvey back to her core fanbase after a number of years but also allowed her to access a hitherto unheard-of level of international publicity for an indie star. Suddenly, the modest, thoughtful and resolutely un-rockstar-like Polly Jean, used to lapping up the critical praise but

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