The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Tag album

REVIEW: James Blake – ‘Assume Form’ (Polydor)

‘Assume Form’ is not the kind of cold and subdued album for which many have pigeonholed James Blake, but a warm release, full of intricate hooks and devastating lyricism.

REVIEW: Alessia Cara – ‘The Pains Of Growing’ (Def Jam / UMG)

‘The Pains Of Growing’ is a comforting, well-written and executed pop record, but stylistically it still keeps you wondering what exactly Alessia Cara’s sound is.

REVIEW: Anderson .Paak – ‘Oxnard’ (Aftermath / 12 Tone)

Stepping up to the majors and littered with guest features, Anderson .Paak’s ‘Oxnard’ unfortunately sacrifices some of its creator’s personality for commercial gain.

REVIEW: The 1975 – ‘A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships’ (Dirty Hit / Polydor)

Listening to The 1975 trying to actively forge an intelligent, overarching statement in an era when sincerity has long since died makes ‘A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships’ arguably the most relevant pop album this decade.

CULT ’70s: Siouxsie & The Banshees – ‘The Scream’

A key marker in the evolution of the British post-punk and goth scenes, Siouxsie & The Banshees’ 1978 debut album ‘The Scream’ is brilliantly and darkly compelling.

REVIEW: J Mascis – ‘Elastic Days’ (Sub Pop)

It’s very much business as usual on Dinosaur Jr. frontman J Mascis’ latest solo offering ‘Elastic Days’ – and that’s a really great thing.

REVIEW: Muse – ‘Simulation Theory’ (Warner)

When you think that ‘Simulation Theory’ is the work of the same band that once did ‘Origin Of Symmetry’, you realise how depressingly cynical Muse have become.

REVIEW: Fightmilk – ‘Not With That Attitude’ (Reckless Yes)

London-based indie-punk quarter Fightmilk deliver a solid debut album that shows great promise for future evolution with ‘Not With That Attitude’.

REVIEW: Vince Staples – ‘FM!’ (Def Jam / Universal)

An exhilarating 22-minute blast of bizarre and inventive fun, ‘FM!’ might be a detour in the journey of Vince Staples but shows exactly what music ought to be in 2018.