The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Posts by Ellie Wolf

REVIEW: Muse – ‘Simulation Theory’ (Warner)

When you think that ‘Simulation Theory’ is the work of the same band that once did ‘Origin Of Symmetry’, you realise how depressingly cynical Muse have become.

REVIEW: Connan Mockasin – ‘Jassbusters’ (Kemado / Mexican Summer)

Connan Mockasin is still a precocious talent, but far too much of ‘Jassbusters’ drifts by without making any impression.

REVIEW: Twenty One Pilots – ‘Trench’ (Fueled By Ramen)

‘Trench’ is the mature and well-crafted Twenty One Pilots album to date, achieving tonal coherence and with some of the best production in current alternative music and an intriguing dystopian narrative thread running through it.

REVIEW: Villagers – ‘The Art Of Pretending To Swim’ (Domino)

Conor O’Brien oversees another gentle expansion of the sonic terms of Villagers with the project’s beguiling fifth album ‘The Art Of Pretending To Swim’.

REVIEW: Jungle – ‘For Ever’ (XL)

It took Jungle a long four years to make, but ‘For Ever’ is little more than a holding pattern after the success of their debut.

REVIEW: Death Cab For Cutie – ‘Thank You For Today’ (Atlantic / WEA)

Death Cab For Cutie’s ninth album ‘Thank You For Today’ does what it does extremely well, but 20 years into their career, it suffers from an almost total lack of surprise.

REVIEW: The Internet – ‘Hive Mind’ (Columbia / Sony)

The Internet’s fourth album ‘Hive Mind’ sees each member’s talents are rendered in the service of the others, making for a record that’s at the peak of contemporary R&B.

REVIEW: Dirty Projectors – ‘Lamp Lit Prose’ (Domino)

After the harrowing self-doubt and heartbreak of ‘Dirty Projectors’, David Longstreth emerges into the light of hope and new love on ‘Lamp Lit Prose’.

REVIEW: Kamasi Washington – ‘Heaven And Earth’ (Shoto Mas / Young Turks)

Kamasi Washington’s latest epic double-album ‘Heaven And Earth’ is another artistic triumph, the band-leader executing ambitious arrangements without irony or pretension.

REVIEW: Kanye West – ‘ye’ (G.O.O.D. Music / Def Jam)

‘ye’ is archetypal and iconic in its own way – but it makes for kind of a dreary listen, a word usually applied last to anything Kanye West produced.

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