The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Tag Damon Albarn

CLASSIC ’90s: Blur – ‘Parklife’

Representing one of the commercial apexes of Britpop in the mid-Nineties, ‘Parklife’ was the realisation of Damon Albarn’s vision for Blur’s music.

REVIEW: Gorillaz – ‘The Now Now’ (Parlophone)

An introspective companion piece to last year’s ‘Humanz’, ‘The Now Now’ is a quiet triumph for Damon Albarn and Gorillaz but still comes nowhere near the heights of their glory years.

CULT ’90s: Blur – ‘Modern Life Is Rubbish’

While it may dwell in ‘Parklife’s shadow in terms of its wider popularity, ‘Modern Life Is Rubbish’ is the most indispensable album of Blur’s career, and formed a key thematic plank for Britpop.

REVIEW: Gorillaz – ‘Humanz’ (Parlophone / Warner Bros.)

Gorillaz’ first proper album in seven years, featuring a galaxy of guest stars, effectively re-boots their sound for 2017, though it’s not as distinctive as it once was.

PODCAST: May 2015 edition

Lauren James and Ed Biggs present their monthly round-up of new album releases, from the biggest rock, indie and pop acts to the best underground albums coming onto our radars, plus a handful of classic LPs from years gone by – click here to listen now! Alternatively, you can subscribe to our podcast by searching for ‘Student Playlist’ or ‘Laser Guided Melodies’ on the iTunes store, or by finding us on PodoMatic! The May

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CLASSIC ’00s: Gorillaz – ‘Demon Days’

by Ed Biggs It’s strange to think an album by a fictional band could have such a sizeable impact, but the 2005 album Demon Days by the animated group Gorillaz, the brainchild of Blur singer Damon Albarn and illustrator Jamie Hewlett, helped to shape the direction of pop music today. For all its undoubted creativity, the project’s self-titled 2001 debut ultimately felt a tad sterile, like a laboratory experiment with a

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REVIEW: Blur – ‘The Magic Whip’ (Parlophone)

by Ed Biggs The announcement of the first Blur album in over a decade, and the first with Graham Coxon since 1999, was one of the biggest music news stories of the first part of 2015. We’d had the big reunion (two of them), the emotional catharsis, the burying of hatchets, and for many, that would have been enough. But the existence of The Magic Whip seems to have solidified the

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FROM WORST TO BEST: Blur singles

With only a couple of days to go until the release of The Magic Whip, their first album in 12 years and first since 1999 with Graham Coxon, what better time to look back at the history of Blur. Starting life at a shambolic yet entertaining art-rock band called Seymour, they signed to indie label Food Records and released their first single ‘I Know / She’s So High’ in October

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A Brief History of Blur

by Ed Biggs Last Thursday’s announcement of a new Blur album triggered an avalanche of excited social media reaction. Not only are they the most fondly-remembered band from the Britpop era alongside their great rivals Oasis, but they left behind a body of work that, by and large, has stood up to the test of time. Their summer reunion tours of 2009 and 2012 are the stuff of legend, but

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