The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Tag dead oceans

REVIEW: Kevin Morby – ‘Sundowner’ (Dead Oceans)

A soundtrack for isolation and reflection, Kevin Morby’s latest album ‘Sundowner’ is likely to be remembered as an outlier in his discography.

REVIEW: Bright Eyes – ‘Down In The Weeds, Where The World Once Was’ (Dead Oceans)

The first Bright Eyes album in nine years, ‘Down In The Weeds, Where The World Once Was’ is a consistent and direct display of Conor Oberst’s songwriting power.

REVIEW: Khruangbin – ‘Mordechai’ (Dead Oceans)

On their third album ‘Mordechai’, Khruangbin take their globe-trotting aesthetic in a more conventional pop direction, but it’s no less rewarding.

REVIEW: Destroyer – ‘Have We Met’ (Dead Oceans)

Dan Bejar’s 12th Destroyer album ‘Have We Met’ reaches the heights of his songwriting capability, but frustratingly infrequently.

REVIEW: Durand Jones & The Indications – ‘American Love Call’ (Dead Oceans)

A politicised and socially aware update on their debut, full of soulful and orchestrated swells, ‘American Love Call’ sees Durand Jones & The Indications get serious.

REVIEW: Kevin Morby – ‘Oh My God’ (Dead Oceans)

Exploring church music and the nature of faith in the modern world, ‘Oh My God’ is yet another excellent album in Kevin Morby’s catalogue.

REVIEW: Better Oblivion Community Center – ‘Better Oblivion Community Center’ (Dead Oceans)

Phoebe Bridgers and Conor Oberst explore shared passions and showcase each other’s personalities on ‘Better Oblivion Community Center’.

REVIEW: Mitski – ‘Be The Cowboy’ (Dead Oceans)

A strikingly beautiful and intensely personal triumph, Mitski Miyawaki’s fifth studio album ‘Be The Cowboy’ has firmly established her as one of the best young songwriters in music.

REVIEW: LUMP – ‘LUMP’ (Dead Oceans)

‘LUMP’, a collaboration between Laura Marling and Tunng’s Mike Lindsay, feels like you’re right in the studio amid the exchange of ideas.

REVIEW: Shame – ‘Songs Of Praise’ (Dead Oceans)

‘Songs Of Praise’ is an outstanding debut both lyrically and instrumentally, and shows that Shame may fulfill all those breathless promises that they can save British guitar music.

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