The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Posts by Rebecca Corbett

REVIEW: Field Music – ‘Making A New World’ (Memphis Industries)

‘Making A New World’ could have been Field Music’s masterpiece, but its message is often buried underneath layers of wilfully impenetrable art-rock.

REVIEW: Girl Ray – ‘Girl’ (Moshi Moshi)

With ‘Girl’, North London trio Girl Ray deliver a radiant, summery sophomore effort as the country heads into winter.

REVIEW: Chelsea Wolfe – ‘Birth Of Violence’ (Sargent House)

Embracing a gothic, more intimate style, Chelsea Wolfe opens up new avenues for her sound with latest album ‘Birth Of Violence’.

REVIEW: Sam Fender – ‘Hypersonic Missiles’ (Polydor / Universal)

While it wears its Springsteen influences a little too heavily at times, ‘Hypersonic Missiles’ demonstrates Sam Fender’s storytelling qualities in abundance.

REVIEW: Frankie Cosmos – ‘Close It Quietly’ (Sub Pop)

Greta Kline’s knack for clipped, emotionally disruptive songwriting under her Frankie Cosmos moniker remains as compelling as ever on ‘Close It Quietly’.

REVIEW: Shura – ‘forevher’ (Secretly Canadian)

Alexandra Denton’s second Shura album ‘forevher’ essays the thrills and anxieties of falling in love.

REVIEW: Penelope Isles – ‘Until The Tide Creeps In’ (Bella Union)

Lush, summery dream-pop dominates the mood on ‘Until The Tide Creeps In’, the debut album from new British indie hopefuls Penelope Isles.

REVIEW: Hatchie – ‘Keepsake’ (Heavenly / P.I.A.S.)

A significantly more varied effort than last year’s ‘Sugar & Spice’ EP, Harriette Pilbeam’s debut album as Hatchie shows that dream-pop is a world with almost unlimited possibilities.

  • 1 2 4