The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Posts by Ed Biggs

CULT ’80s: New Order – ‘Low-Life’

by Ed Biggs After beginning life after Joy Division with a slightly shaky start in the form of Movement (1981), an understandably downcast and introverted record, New Order began to spread their wings and capture the public’s imagination with 1983’s Power, Corruption & Lies, which is one of those peculiar records that is not only admired in spite of its flaws, but precisely because of them.

LIVE REVIEW: Live At Leeds 2015

by Matthew Langham On the first Bank Holiday Saturday in May, The Student Playlist returned to Live At Leeds for a third year in a row. Having enjoyed vintage years in 2013 and 2014 with acts from all manner of musical disciplines, #LAL2015 seemed a bit thin on the ground in terms of established acts, at first glance at least. The bill was crammed with cutting edge indie artists familiar

Continue reading…

REVIEW: My Morning Jacket – ‘The Waterfall’ (ATO Records)

by Ed Biggs Since their 2005 masterpiece Z, My Morning Jacket have been enjoying a status in America similar to that of The Cribs in Britain – probably the country’s biggest ‘small band’. They’ve got a significant cult following, critical adoration and a small impact in wider popular culture, even once appearing in an episode of Seth Macfarlane’s ‘American Dad!’, but they’ve never really broken through into the mainstream.

REVIEW: Palma Violets – ‘Danger In The Club’ (Rough Trade)

by Ed Biggs Following the breathless reviews of their signature song ‘Best Of Friends’ that put them on the radar at the end of 2012, Palma Violets scrambled to capitalise on the exposure with the rushed release of their debut album 180, a record that displayed promise but was low on original ideas and ultimately undercooked.

REVIEW: Mumford & Sons – ‘Wilder Mind’ (Island / Gentlemen of the Road)

by Ed Biggs Unless you’ve been marooned on a desert island for the last two months, you can’t fail to have noticed all the talk about old-timey folk impersonators Mumford & Sons “going electric” with their third album. The formerly self-identified ‘gentlemen of the road’ have ditched the accordions, banjos, waistcoats and tweed and opted for leather jackets, electric guitars and keyboards.

PODCAST: April 2015 edition

Lauren James and Ed Biggs present a review of the biggest and best album releases of April 2015, and a handful of classic LPs from years gone by – click here to listen now! Includes reviews of the following albums: Blur – The Magic Whip Drenge – Undertow The Wombats – Glitterbug East India Youth – Culture Of Volume We’ve also got a brand new track from The Vaccines ahead of their third album next month, and

Continue reading…

In Conversation With: Forever Cult, Live At Leeds 2015

We caught up with Leeds three-piece Forever Cult after their early set at Live At Leeds 2015, played at the cosy confines of The Key Club. Their heavy sonic mixture contains elements of grunge, British and American indie and traces of classic rock, making it familiar but distinctively theirs. With their current single ‘Winter’s Glow’ released at the end of March and a forthcoming single ‘Antonio Banderas’ later in the

Continue reading…

REVIEW: Baby Chaos – ‘Skulls, Skulls, Skulls, Show Me The Glory’ (Baby Chaos)

by Ed Biggs The last decade’s trend for bands to reunite has accelerated to the point where groups that hardly anyone has heard of or cared about the first time round are getting back together to chance their arm at the nostalgia dollar. But at least Scottish rabble-rousers Baby Chaos can point to a brand new record to lend their reformation some artistic credibility.

REVIEW: Mew – ‘+-‘ (PIAS / Universal)

by Matthew Langham For Danish art-rockers Mew it’s been six years since their last release No More Stories…. Their long awaited sixth effort +- is in a very similar vein to previous releases of MOR-inspired proggy-pop. With the help of Bloc Party’s Russell Lissack on guitar duties on ‘My Complications’, lead singer Jonas Bjerre’s vocals provide the most interesting element to the record. His distinct style draws him comparisons to French

Continue reading…

REVIEW: Blur – ‘The Magic Whip’ (Parlophone)

by Ed Biggs The announcement of the first Blur album in over a decade, and the first with Graham Coxon since 1999, was one of the biggest music news stories of the first part of 2015. We’d had the big reunion (two of them), the emotional catharsis, the burying of hatchets, and for many, that would have been enough. But the existence of The Magic Whip seems to have solidified the

Continue reading…