The Student Playlist

Showcasing the Best New Music, Curating the Classics

Category New Album Releases

REVIEW: King Krule – ‘The OOZ’ (XL Recordings)

Archy Marshall’s second King Krule album ‘The OOZ’ is an ambitious sprawl of jazz, hip-hop, scratchy acoustic balladry and beat poetry.

REVIEW: Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile – ‘Lotta Sea Lice’ (Marathon Artists)

On ‘Lotta Sea Lice’, Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile aren’t trying to impress you; instead they’re just inviting you to sit on the floor and listen to them play.

REVIEW: St. Vincent – ‘MASSEDUCTION’ (Loma Vista)

‘MASSEDUCTION’ can be read both as St. Vincent being seduced into significant Pop culture relevancy and, conversely, her taking the entire medium of celebrity and Pop and making it work for her. Choosing to interpret it as the latter makes for one of the best and consistent listens of the year.

REVIEW: Beck – ‘Colors’ (Fonograf / Capitol)

Beck’s tenth studio album ‘Colors’ is fun, but ultimately lacks the real substance that made his previous glories so enduring.

REVIEW: Benjamin Clementine – ‘I Tell A Fly’ (Behind / Virgin EMI)

The follow-up to his Mercury Prize-winning debut, ‘I Tell A Fly’ is a bold, experimental and largely successful step forward for Benjamin Clementine.

REVIEW: Kelela – ‘Take Me Apart’ (Warp Records)

Pulsating, heady and intricately vulnerable, Kelela’s debut album ‘Take Me Apart’ is a strong musical statement in the world of innovative R&B.

REVIEW: Liam Gallagher – ‘As You Were’ (Warner Bros.)

‘As You Were’ is fundamentally solid, but it’s just too hard not to compare it to the brash public persona that Liam Gallagher has constructed and be a touch disappointed.

REVIEW: Weaves – ‘Wide Open’ (Memphis Industries)

On their sophomore album ‘Wide Open’, Toronto’s Weaves exude increased confidence and identity that stands them in good stead for future efforts.

REVIEW: TORRES – ‘Three Futures’ (4AD)

Mackenzie Scott’s third TORRES album ‘Three Futures’ has pushed into the highest echelon of women working at the peak of their powers in indie.